Whizzy Science:  Make It Zoom!


Make It Zoom

When I look at children’s’ science trade books, I find lots and lots of them about animals and ecology, and precious few about forces and motion. Why? Animals are adorable, and kids love them! Forces just aren’t very cuddly! However, the activities you can do with them are great fun!! That’s what Anna Claybourne’s book Whizzy Science: Make It Zoom is all about!

Each of her dozen different topics includes an attention-getting question or statement, activity, explanation, and “what’s next” questions or ideas to delve further into the topic. Interspersed throughout the colorful and clever illustrations are additional tidbits of topic-related information. Some of the topics include forces, laws of motion, friction, catapults, rockets, and magnets. At the end of the book are a glossary and books and websites for further reading.

Of note is this book has an Australian publisher. Consequently, there are a couple of terms that may be different than US usage, such as “Jelly.” In America we would use the term “Jello.” See if you can find any more!

I think this book could be used with a variety of grade levels (K—4), and would meet many state and national standards. It is available from Amazon.

 

Claybourne, Anna. Make It Zoom! Sidney: Wayland, 2014. Print.

 

NGSS:

K-PS2-1 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

K-PS2-2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull

3-PS2-1 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

3-PS2-2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

4-PS3-3 Energy

Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.